Dear Banjo by Sasha Wasley – New Release

Sasha Wasley is one of my best writing buddies and over the past two years I’ve watched her work tirelessly on her books. She has an amazing talent for creating living, breathing characters no matter the age or genre. It’s so exciting to see such a huge launch come to life with the release of Dear Banjo, the first in a rural romance series.

Make sure you scroll all the way to the bottom to read the excerpt!

DB 1000 wide

They were best friends who were never meant to fall in love – but for one of them, it was already way too late.

Willow ‘Banjo’ Paterson and Tom Forrest were raised on neighbouring cattle stations in the heart of the Kimberley. As young adults, sharing the same life dreams, something came between them that Willow cannot forget. Now ten years have passed since she’s even spoken to Tom.

When her father falls ill, Willow is called home to take over the running of the family property, Paterson Downs. Her vision for a sustainable, organic cattle station is proving hard to achieve. She needs Tom’s help, but is it too late, and all too complicated, to make amends?

Tom’s heartfelt, decade-old letters remain unopened and unmentioned between them, and Willow must find the courage to finally read them. Their tattered pages reveal a love story like no other – and one you’ll never forget.

Dear Banjo is a wildly romantic and utterly captivating story about first love and second chances from an exciting new Australian author.

 

Buy Links

Dear Banjo is now available in paperback and e-book editions. Visit your local bookstore or department store to pick up a copy. Some purchase links are below or search your favourite outlet.

About the Author

Sasha Wasley was born and raised in Perth, Western Australia.

She has completed a PhD in cultural theory and loves nature, Jane Austen and puns.

Sasha is a farming wannabe, with a passion for animals and the land. Although she’s in her forties now, she still wants a pony.

Her debut novel, a young adult paranormal, was published in 2014. Today, she lives and writes in the Swan Valley wine region with her partner and two daughters, surrounded by dogs, cats and chickens.

Sasha writes mystery, paranormal and young adult novels as S.D. Wasley.

Follow Sasha

Excerpt from Chapter 1

Somehow she managed to pack up the entire apartment overnight. On the way to the airport the next morning, Willow got the taxi driver to drop in at Tanya’s place. Her friend was still in her pyjamas when Willow gave her the keys to her apartment and a couple of hundred dollars. Tanya tried to refuse the money but Willow pushed it into her hand.

‘No, Tan, I’ve booked professional cleaners and I need you to pay them for me. Keep whatever’s left over as a thanks. And could you possibly go in and get rid of the boxes I’ve left behind? You can have anything from them or just donate it all to charity. And then if you could just drop the keys off to the real estate agent, I’ll be grateful forever.’

Tanya nodded and her eyes went a little glassy. ‘You’re really going, aren’t you? For good, I mean.’

‘Yeah. Going home at last. I can’t believe I stayed in the city this long.’

Tears spilled down Tanya’s cheeks. ‘I’m going to miss you.’

‘Oh, Tan. You should come visit.’ Willow hugged her. ‘I’ll stay in touch.’

‘It’s not the same,’ Tanya sobbed.

‘I’ll call you in a couple of days, okay?’

Tanya nodded and gave her another tearful hug before letting Willow leave.

Jeez, Willow thought as she ran back to the taxi. Shows of emotion had never been her thing. Okay, she was moving a couple of thousand kilometres away, and she’d miss seeing Tanya at work, but surely it wasn’t worth crying over.

A memory of her sessions with a psychologist surfaced. Willow, you tend to hold people at arm’s length. Why don’t you try letting people in a little more? Willow snapped her attention back to the present, logging into the power company’s website on her phone to cancel her account.

She checked in for her flight and paid an exorbitant amount for her excess baggage before watching it glide away on the conveyer belt – the sum total of her adult life in two large suitcases. No, she remembered. 3700 square kilometres, 6500 head of cattle, a ground­breaking, humane, organic beef operation. That would be the sum total of her adult life.

She settled into her seat and thanked the heavens she’d been placed next to a young fly-in-fly-out type, probably contracted to the Herne River catchment project. He was already plugged into his tablet and watching a show involving zombies, so she wouldn’t have to talk to anyone during the flight. She wanted to write a to-do list. As soon as they were in the air she reached into her bag for a note­pad and her hand met something unfamiliar. Not her notepad.

Tom’s letters.

Willow considered them, her heart rate bumping up all over again. Wouldn’t it almost be an invasion of Tom’s privacy to read them now, so long after he’d intended her to? Maybe those sleeping dogs should just be left to lie?

Yes, she would bin them all – drop them into the roving rubbish bag the next time the steward came around.

But she would be living next door to the Forrests again once she got home. By now, Tom would soon be taking over Quintilla, just as she was about to do with Paterson Downs. Their families were as close as ever. She’d need to resume some kind of relationship with Tom Forrest, no matter how difficult the initial patching up phase would be.

Maybe she could use this three-hour flight from Perth to Mount Clair to read all of Tom’s letters at last. She hadn’t even given the poor guy a chance after looking at the first couple. She’d been so absorbed in her own pain; grappling with the panic she felt every time she thought about what he’d done. Perhaps there had been an apology in one of those letters – an apology she should have acknowledged by now. A retraction of that awful moment when he’d said those words . . .

Tom’s handwriting was scrawled across the front of the topmost envelope – always familiar, no matter how long it had been. Willow took a shaky breath. Seven-thirty in the morning was a little early for a stiff drink, so she requested a coffee and pulled out the first two letters; the ones she’d opened and read ten years earlier.

 

Dear Banjo,

Happy New Year. I guess you’re settled in at the student hall by now. You sure went early. The other kids who got in aren’t leaving until February. I don’t know where you’re staying so I asked Beth to send this on to you. You might have heard I’m probably not going to take up my offer of a place at uni. I’m thinking I’ll defer my course – for now, anyway. Dad’s not fazed. He won’t have to hire extra help this way, not to mention the savings on the tuition fees. Mum’s not overly happy but I keep telling her it’s only for the year. She asks a lot of questions. Not really sure what else to say to you, Banjo. It’s weird without you. Whenever I’m on the quad I turn towards Patersons before I remember you’re not there any more. I keep thinking I’ll see you at the eastern gate, sitting on Rusty, ready for a fenceline race. You knew I’d always beat you but you’d have a go anyway. So, yep. Really weird. You’ve always just been there. I guess it doesn’t quite compute yet. Take care of yourself in the big city, okay?

Tom

P.S. We should probably try to sort this mess out.

 

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Part III Publishing The Shadow Series

Facebook bannerWe are in the middle of a publishing revolution, traditionally it was a long hard road to become a published author and the path was paved with rejections slips. Publishing a book is a big job and publishing houses don’t have the resources to print all the books that are sent to them. Instead they have to be picky, usually deciding whether or not a book is sellable within the first few sentences. It’s a competitive market and a lot of bestselling books were rejected by numerous publishing houses before someone agreed to take them on. For an unknown author the chances of getting a foot in the door are pretty slim. These days with the power of social media and the internet, doing it yourself is perfectly achievable. I’ve been reading since I was a child, I know books and felt confident I could produce one with a completely professional look.

Beyond the Shadows Book One

Book One Beyond the Shadows

I knew the first place I had to start was with the cover, it’s a cliché we’ve all heard before, ‘never judge a book by its cover’ but let’s face it, we all do. I searched long and hard for a cover artist for The Shadow Series and eventually decided on award winning designer Damon ZA. He was more expensive than other artists I’d found but he made an offer that was impossible to turn down. Two covers to choose from and unlimited changes until you were happy with the finished product. It’s pretty scary having someone put a cover to your book so the added security of unlimited changes was what sold me. Now I don’t think I could work with anyone else. He was creative and fast, I gave him full artistic reign and he produced the four amazing covers with just brief book descriptions to work with. I honestly couldn’t be happier with the finished product.

 

Writing the blurbs—that short paragraph on the back of the book—was one of the hardest things! I wrote so many and had numerous people critique them for me but it didn’t make the decision any easier. How do you use one paragraph to sum up an entire novel? And how do you make it intriguing without giving too much away? That little project in itself was a major time drainer. As a reader you don’t often think about who wrote the blurb and yet that’s the paragraph that draws you in. If it’s bad—forget about it. That’s a lot of pressure to work under! Same with book titles, they did undergo a few changes, it’s hard to get the balance just right. I wanted four titles that went well as a set but I also had to make sure they sounded like they were the right genre.

ShadowHunters_Ebook

Book Two Shadow Hunters

Then when it came down to formatting I had no idea of the drama I would face, I had to do two versions: a print and an ebook. They are completely different so there’s no way to get away with doing it just once. Even little things like choosing the font is difficult, it does actually make a difference in the readability of a book. If the letters are too close together it’s hard on the eyes, you don’t want it too big or too small and it’s important to watch out for tricky letters like w and x, they have a habit of running together. There are also a lot of fiddly things like choosing margin sizing, headers and footers, the positioning of your chapters and section breaks. Indents are a big one, a large indent looks ridiculous and if you pick up a book you will notice the first line in a new paragraph or chapter isn’t indented, how on earth do you set your computer to do that? I learnt a lot in the process of formatting the print book. I spent a lot of time working on the front matter: the title page, copyright page, the acknowledgements and dedication. I made mistakes like adding the front matter without formatting section breaks then I couldn’t set the headers and footers to skip the first few pages. All these little details impact the overall impression of a book, all I can say is, I don’t know where I’d be without Google!

And there were more hurdles after that. I needed my word document to be a PDF but all the programs I tried for conversion changed the custom page sizes back to A4 and then threw out all my formatting. I had a friend with Adobe which automatically registered my custom pages but his computer didn’t have the same font I’d used and once again it threw my formatting out. There was always a solution but it was certainly a test of patience.

InNightsShadow_ebook

Book Three In Night’s Shadow

Once the print version had gone to the printer I focused my attention on the ebooks, I published through Smashwords which offers a step by step guide to formatting, it was time consuming but I didn’t run into any major problems. My main fear with the ebooks is that there is no set appearance. With the print book I formatted everything and I know exactly where every indent or space is going to sit. With an ebook it’s not that simple, they are designed to be read on multiple devices so it will look different depending on whether it’s read on a phone or an ereader.

Then there’s Amazon *insert a big sigh of frustration here* oh Amazon. I don’t know why they make it so hard! They offer a program called KDP where you can publish your ebook to their kindle store. Months before I even reached this stage I did a lot of research and found that Amazon also liked to make you exclusive. Meaning that once you publish with them you can’t publish with anyone else. Amazon’s great for people who own a Kindle but what about people who have an ipad or other ereader? Being exclusive to Amazon would mean other people couldn’t read my books. I knew authors who were published on both Amazon and Smashwords so I knew it was possible. I spent many frustrated hours searching for the loop hole, in the end I have to thank my Goodreads author buddies for pointing me in the right direction. It turns out when you sign up for Amazon’s KDP program there is a little box waiting to be checked. If you tick it you’re exclusive, if you ignore it you can publish wherever you want. It’s so simple but Amazon made it very difficult to find that information.

So I thought I was good to go but when I tried to sign up for their program I discovered you can’t sell on Amazon with an Australian bank account, you need an account in an Amazon supported country. I had a traumatic couple of days trying to figure out how I was going to manage that. I was then thrilled to learn I already had a UK bank account set up by my grandad when I was child. Still that wasn’t good enough, the account had to be credit not savings. My sister currently lives in Ireland and she suggested I use her Irish account as she’ll be moving to Australia in a couple of months. Even trying to enter her details involved converted account numbers to internationally recognised numbers. And that’s not it. Selling a product in the US means you need a US tax number. But I’m Australian and I’ll be taxed by my own country for my earnings. In that case I need a tax exemption. I had a pretty amusing phone conversation with an American guy working for the IRS, I could barely understand what he was telling me but in the end I found out what I needed to do. I filled out their forms and sent my proof of ID to Texas, now I wait 10 weeks for a tax number, then apply to Amazon and Smashwords for my tax exemption.

The Shadow Thief Book Four

Book Four The Shadow Thief

All of it is achievable but I felt like every time I solved one problem there was another waiting for me, when I finally got to the point of uploading my books to Amazon I was literally skipping around the house in celebration. I made it!

As I am now a small business owner there is also the book keeping and tax details to get through but all of that will come, my website is up and running, the books are in stock and waiting to go. Now I just have to focus on book promotion and doing as much as I possibly can to get my books out in the public. So many people have helped me on this great adventure, I want to thank every single person who has played a part. All the people already mentioned in this blog series, a huge thank you to my brother in law for his hard work on my website, my family and friends for their ongoing support, my amazing boyfriend for showing me the ropes when it comes to marketing and receiving feedback on an artistic creation. For many years I kept my writing life separate from the rest of life but merging the two has made me feel complete and I’m stunned by the new opportunities crossing my path. Tomorrow is the big day, a quadruple book launch, I’m ready!

 

Perth After Dark

I live in Perth and the rest of Australia has a joke about us. “I went to Perth and it was closed.” We are the capital city of Western Australia but we’re considered somewhat backwards from the other cities in … Continue reading