I Write To Give Myself Strength

imagesIt’s no great secret; I’m not particularly good at dealing with stress. But who is? Maybe some people handle it better than others but for me, it’s a weak point that I’m well aware of. That’s why I’ve tailored my life to a point where I can feel both challenged and controlled.

I’m extremely introverted, so pretty much any social situation comes with a degree of challenge. I absolutely love spending time with my friends and family, and I have a pretty active social life which is really important to me. But four hours is pretty much my limit for social interaction. I can certainly stay out longer but once that fourth hour hits my eyes glaze over and I long to be alone.

I do plenty of other things that are outside of my comfort zone and I embrace and enjoy them as a necessary part of my personal development—but that’s a whole other topic.

To keep my stress levels low I like to stick to a good routine. I practice yoga and I meditate, but most importantly—I write. Over the years I’ve wondered why writing helps me so much and while I know it fuels a passion which makes me feel alive, I felt certain there must be more to it and I’ve finally put my finger on it.

Funnily enough it was a yoga teacher who gave me the insight to recognise it.

Quad+Stretch+Yoga+Pose+Vastus+Lateralis+3I generally practice yoga at home but recently I went to a class and found myself subjected to some philosophical wisdom. During the session the teacher guided us into a difficult posture. It was pretty painful and I can’t remember how long we had to hold it but while we were in place the teacher reminded us to think of the posture as a symbol of the challenges we face in life. Often we shy away from the things we find difficult or painful but it’s important we experience them and learnt to deal with them. The posture is uncomfortable and your body is begging for release but you use your breath to acknowledge the difficulty and build confidence that you can progress through it.

downloadDays later I had a particularly tough day at the writing desk. I’d been working really hard to finalise my editing process when I suddenly hit a wall. Nothing seemed to fit and I felt irritable and frustrated. Then the yoga philosophy ran through my head and the two things clicked into place.

While writing a book, there are days when it’s hard and unforgiving, where progress is slow and success seems too far away. There are problems that need to be solved and solutions where you never expect to find them. There are also moments of pure joy and sometimes days of never ending self-doubt. But you keep going, and after days, weeks, months, years … you realise you’re done. Amongst those pages are all your fears, every tough day and all the happiness you experienced in your life as you wrote it.

Writing is a mentor, a place for you to face your demons in a context you can control. It forces you to acknowledge all that you’re afraid of and find a way to live beyond it. Writing is the teacher who works on your own time, harnessing your insecurities until you’re ready to face them. There are times when I’m tense with action or solemn with the despair of my characters but at the end of the day, all of those things have lived inside of me. I can externalise them in my book and look at them objectively. Although it’s taken me a while to understand how this works, my instinct has been right all along. So if you’ve ever thought about writing a book, you should absolutely get started. It will be the most difficult but rewarding thing you can do for yourself and you’ll come out of it a better person.

I’ve said it so many times before, but I’ll say it again—thank god I have this beautiful thing in my life!

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Drop-down Amazon Reviews

This is an interesting concept. Not sure whether to love or hate it. Hopefully it would encourage more readers to leave feedback. I think the majority of the population avoid reviewing because they’re not sure where to start. Maybe this is what they need to get involved.

Nicholas C. Rossis

I found this on the Self Publishing Review and had to share. Apparently, Amazon has been toying with the idea of using drop-down menus for reviews. I guess they’re trying to encourage readers to leave reviews, by simplifying the review process.

I also suspect that Amazon is trying to improve their search engine and optimize their suggestions. Having a standardized means of classification is a much more efficient way of searching, and using the public to do so is probably the only way of achieving this without hiring half the Earth’s population.

The new review form is as follows:

From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

These are the submenu contents:

From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksFrom the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksFrom the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksFrom the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksFrom the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksFrom the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksNow, will this be helpful? Amazon is obviously not convinced, hence the beta-testing. A lot of authors will be upset to find their books reduced to half a dozen simple questions. And readers will probably want to say something more than that an author’s writing was “okay.”

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